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10.04.2014

Vietnamese Carrot and Daikon Pickle (Do Chua)

If you have had Vietnamese food, you have likely encountered the crunchy, sweet and sour Carrot and Daikon Pickles. It is often found in banh mi sandwiches, grilled meat rice plates or rice vermicelli noodle bowls.

Carrot and Daikon pickle on top of grilled lemongrass pork.

According to Andrea Ngyuen of Viet World Kitchen (famed cookbook author and recipe developer), Carrot and Daikon pickles are a quick pickle and do not require the intensive canning that Western pickles do. I would recommend making this pickle first and allow it to sit in the fridge for a day or two before using as it would impart the best flavor. There is nothing that makes me hungry like a cold and crunchy pickle!


Ingredients 
1 lb Daikon radish (look for firm, smooth, unblemished skin)
1 large carrot
1 tsp salt
2 tsp sugar

Brine Mixture
1/2 cup sugar
1 cup lukewarm water
1-1/4 cup distilled white vinegar

Directions
1. With a vegetable peeler, peel off the outer skin of the daikon radish and carrot.

2. Cut both the daikon radish and carrots into thick matchsticks.

3. Sprinkle 1 tsp salt and 2 tsp sugar over the daikon and carrot, massaging the salt and sugar with your hands for 3 minutes until the daikon bends easily but does not break.

4. Rinse the vegetables under cold water and drain. Squeeze dry.

5. Transfer the vegetables into a clean lidded mason jar.

6. Mix the sugar and warm water in a clean bowl or clean lidded jar. Mix or shake until the sugar has dissolved. Add in vinegar.

7. Pour the brine over the vegetables and make sure it fully covers the vegetables.

8. Allow to marinade at least 1 hour prior to using. I prefer marinating it for at least a day or two in the fridge so the pickles are cold, sour and crunchy.

Keeps in the fridge for up to 4 weeks. Serve over Grilled Lemongrass Pork, banh mi sandwiches or rice noodle bowls.



Source: Viet World Kitchen

TIP
  • Buy smaller daikon as they tend to be sweeter and less spicy
  • Adjust the daikon and carrot ratio to your own preference. I personally prefer more carrots over daikon
  • Thoroughly wash the mason jars and all utensils with dish detergent. My husband prefers to boil the jars and lids before using.

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